Detecting licenses in code with Go and ML

Detecting the license of an open source projects is harder than it seems. We have created go-license-detector, a Go library and command line application to solve that task.

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Calling C functions from BigQuery with Web Assembly

As part of our experimentations at source{d}, we decided to try and run a C library on BigQuery. Learn this blog post to see how web assembly came to the rescue, and what other improvements we had to apply to achieve decent performance.

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Measuring code sentiment in a Git repository

This is the transcript of our MLonCode talk on GopherCon Russia. The idea is to combine the technologies we’ve developed to solve a toy problem: find funny comments.

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Why did I join source{d}? - Francesc Campoy

The first post of a series on why multiple employees joined source{d}. This one is by Francesc Campoy.

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source{d} does FOSDEM 2018

Almost every source{d} employee just came back from FOSDEM 2018 and we have so much to tell you!

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Announcing the latest go-git!

After a year of intense work, we’re happy to announce the latest and best release of go-git ever. go-git v4 includes many new features, making it the most used and feature complete git library written in Go, and in use on production at companies like source{d} and keybase.

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Source Code Identifier Embeddings

‘Embed and conquer’, they say. Everything which has a context can be embedded. word2vec, node2vec, product2vec… id2vec! We take source code identifiers, introduce the context as the scope in the Abstract Syntax Tree, and find out that ‘send’ is to ‘receive’ as ‘push’ is to ‘pop’.

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enry: detecting languages

Announcing enry, a faster implementation of github/linguist in Go for programming language detection

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source{d} tech talks, frontend series

Once every few months, source{d} organizes small conferences around very specific topics. On June 24th, the topic was frontend and the talks were hosted in our Madrid office. Almost 50 people joined us for a day full of things to learn about frontend technologies.

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Analyzing GitHub, how developers change programming languages over time

This post is inspired by “The eigenvector of why we moved from language X to language Y”, by Erik Bernhardsson. Based on GitHub repositories, we build our own transition matrix after solving the flow optimization problem. The results are reflecting the history of programming language competition in the open source world.

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